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Liguria

Liguria is a region on the northwest coast of Italy and the third smallest of the twenty regions of the country.
Liguria borders France to the west, Piedmont to the north, and Emilia – Romagna and Tuscany to the east.

It lies on the Ligurian Sea (a northerly area of ​​sea in the Mediterranean). The coastal strip forms the Italian Riviera and further inland lies The Ligurian Alps to the west and The Ligurian Apennines in the east.

Despite the fact that the region is densely populated comprise half of the area of forest area. The Ligurian coast has a typical Mediterranean climate, in contrast to the partly continental climate of Podalen in the north.

In January Genoa has a normal temperature of 10.8 º C siege, without frost that often only occurs in mountainous areas. In the summer the temperature around 25-30 ° C.

It can sometimes come much rain and mountains located near the coast forms an orographic effect, so Genoa can get up to 2000 mm per year. Normal rainfall in the Mediterranean is around 500-800 mm.

Liguria is a very old name that goes back to pre-Roman times. Ligurians settled in ancient times down the Mediterranean coast from the Rhone valley of the Arno Valley, but later the people mixed with Gallic immigrants and the Gallo- Ligurian culture.

The region was officially governed and colonized by the Roman Republic in 100 century BC. In the Middle Ages had Genova increasingly control of Liguria, which share most of the story is, with the city.

Aside from a few periods of 1400 – and the early 1500s when the area was under either the Duchy of Milan or France, ruled the Republic of Genoa area until 1796, when Napoleon Bonaparte reorganized the area of the Ligurian Republic.
Republic was short lived and was annexed by France in 1805. After the Napoleonic wars even in 1815 the area was annexed by the Kingdom of Sardinia.

During the great financial crisis of 1980 – and 1990 moved 200,000 inhabitants from Liguria, but after the economic fortunes improved in the late 1990s, many moved back.

Source: Wikipedia



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